Microsoft Dynamics vendors provide comparisons and opinions to professionals in the ERP/Accounting software selection process

 
 

Mark Rockwell, Rockton Software

The Do’s & Dont’s for a More Effective Presentation in the Microsoft Dynamics Community


Email | Print

I seem to be doing more and more virtual presentations. And, I’ve been attending a number of live presentations, such as The Partner Event. As attendees of live and virtual presentations, we have been bored by the snoozers and entertained by the catchy openings, but have we really taken a look at our own presentations within the Microsoft Dynamics Community? Here are some tips that I've learned over the seven years I've worked at Rockton Software:

 

Do:

  • Arrive early, test the equipment—be sure everything is functioning as planned
  • Think about what your audience wants to gain from the presentation
  • Practice . . . I can’t emphasize this enough!
  • Be the expert—deliver with confidence
  • NAIL the opening: Use the STAR Method (Startle, tell a story, ask a question, or recite a quote) Example: Mark Rockwell NAILED his opening at the Technical Airlift 2012
  • Have a creative title (ex. Think up a new password? Most would rather clean the toilet)
  • Outline your objective or purpose
  • Tell them what you’re going to tell them, and then tell them.
  • Engage your audience—ask leading questions or ask for feedback
  • Use graphics when possible—a picture is worth a thousand words
  • Keep it simple—one key idea per slide
  • Practice . . . oops, did I already mention that?
  • Make eye contact
  • Practice . . . it’s important!
  • Ask for feedback—it is how we improve

 

Don't:

  • Present on a topic you don’t like, understand, or believe because if you aren’t passionate about it—your audience can tell
  • Distribute handouts during the presentation—dispense at the beginning or end
  • Mumble, shout, or rush your cadence—speak clearly
  • Use acronyms without explaining them
  • Read your PowerPoint
  • Create an eye test on your screen—use large enough fonts
  • Save all the good information for the end
  • Overdo bullets
  • Get distracted
  • Be boring
  • Lock in on an hour—if you need an hour that is fine, but if you don’t then be respectful of your audience’s time

 

Wishing for more tips on live and virtual presentations?

 

Written by Martie Mitchell, Sales Manager at Rockton Software.

Comments are closed.