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Tips to Making an ERP Upgrade a Success


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Most organizations are realizing their ERP system is not just a key part of their IT strategies, but one of their most important and sensitive corporate assets. ERP systems should have at least a 15- to 20-year useful life, but over that time they will need to be maintained and enhanced to protect their value and serve the changing needs of the business. Perhaps even more important is the role that upgrades play in adding new functionality, improving business processes, and extending the deployment of ERP suites.

Companies need to plan for periodic updates just to ensure the reliability of mission-critical applications. To ensure success of an upgrade, here are some areas to consider:

  • Be sure to define the strategy and timing for ERP upgrades
  • Get support, build consensus and communicate your ERP strategy
  • Consider how you will justify the cost and resources required for an ERP upgrade
  • Create a project plan for a successful upgrade
  • Consider organizational and governance options
  • Outline the resources, services, and tools needed for upgrades

Too often we see companies underestimate the level of effort and the broad impact of an ERP upgrade.  Click here for a detailed report or contact us at [email protected].

By ERT Group – Florida Microsoft Gold Certified Partner

4 Responses to “Tips to Making an ERP Upgrade a Success”

  1. BabbleWare says:

    Interesting article…except it forgets one thing. The useful life described of 15 – 20 years is true. The average age of an ERP, according to Ray Wang with Constellation Research, is 11.5 Years old. There is no way for a company, whom is paying 20% a year in maintenance charges on a stable system, can actually upgrade. If they could, they wouldn’t be 11.5 years behind…they would be current.

    Gartner calculates it will cost $500B in 2010 to upgrade the old versions to new versions. Why? Aren’t upgrades free? Not if you made any change to your existing system – then it is a rip and replace which isn’t free and therefore you might as well look for another ERP company. If you didn’t manage to change a single line of code, and congratulations for that foresight, it is still a rip and replace because your 11.5 year old data model and architecture no longer match the current version. So yippee….all those maintenance fees you paid us resulted in zero upgrades and an end of life architecture.

  2. JR says:

    You can shorten the time it takes to do you upgrade project by using a software automation product called Panaya. http://panaya.savisolve.com